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How Big Do Maine Coon Cats Get? 8 Real Life Examples.

The Maine coon is the largest of the domestic cat breeds and because of this they are commonly known as ‘gentle giants’. Even so, there are a wide range of sizes when looking at fully grown Maine coons. This variation means there are also no standardised growth charts available to monitor young coons as they grow up.

In general a healthy, adult Maine coon can weigh anything between 8 and 20 pounds, this will largely depend on their length. The average length of a fully grown Maine coon is around 40 inches from the tip of their nose to the end of their tail.

The Maine coon breed originated in Maine, New England. The evolved to survive harsh winters by growing a thick, double-layered fur coat. They developed big bones and strong muscles to allow them to hunt in the wild and large paws for walking around in the snow.

As Kittens, Maine coons are same weight as any other cat but may look slightly bigger as they are just so fluffy! Don’t let that deceive you though as these creatures will soon overshoot their other domestic cat friends and grow into miniature lions. Maine coon Kittens will gain an average of 2lbs per month which can be double what Kittens of other cat breeds will achieve.


Maine coons reach maturity much slower than other domestic breeds of cat which on average only take one year to reach their adult size. They usually reach physical maturity around the age of 4 years, but this can often vary between the ages of 3 and 5.

A Maine coon cross breed will likely not have the same growth potential as a purebred Maine coon but it does of course depend on the breed that they have been crossed with. Because they are not pure coon you may also find that they are fully grown much earlier.

Difference in Size Between Males and Females

A fully grown female Maine coon cat can be significantly smaller than their male counterparts. The average male Maine coon will weigh between 13 and 18 pounds. A female Maine coon on the other hand usually weighs between 8 and 15 pounds. Again, their weight will largely depend on their length and height. It is not uncommon for male Maine coons to grow to weigh over 20 pounds and this can still be considered perfectly healthy!

See the table below for 8 real life example of Maine coon weights over the first year and when fully grown (as you can see with the females the weights are quite variable!):


Male (lbs)
Male (lbs)
Male (lbs)
Male (lbs)
Female (lbs)
Female (lbs)
Female (lbs)
Female (lbs)
3 months
5.5
6
5
4.5
4
4.5
6
3
6 months
10.5
10
9
10.5
8
9
8
7
9 months
14
12
11.5
12.5
10.5
14
10.5
9
12 months
15
14.5
14
15
11.5
16
11
10
Fully grown
24
22
24
22
19
23
14
12.5


Record-Breaking Coons

The current record-holder for the longest (living) domestic cat is Barivel, a Maine coon in Italy. He measures a whopping 120cm in length (around 47 inches). Previously there was a world record for the heaviest domestic cat but Guinness are no longer recognising weight as a measurement for record-breaking cats (probably so not to encourage the over-feeding of cats resulting in obesity).

Obesity

It is important to avoid your Maine coon from becoming obese. The trouble is that is often tough to tell where the fur ends and the coon begins! The Maine coon breed is genetically prone to developing joint issues. Having such a large frame will inevitably stress on the joints. Any additional weight gain will only add to this stress which can lead to painful osteoarthritis. Painful joints will discourage your coon from moving and so the weight gain increases, it’s a vicious cycle!

Be careful not to overfeed your coon. Specially formulated Maine coon feed is widely available. It contains higher protein levels than mainstream cat foods to account for the fact that Maine coons are larger animals with a more muscular build. Stick to the recommended quantities on the packaging and, as hard as it is, limit the giving of treats. Instead show your love for your coon with cuddles, play and regular gentle grooming sessions. You can read more about the ideal diet for a Maine coon in my care guide: What Do Maine Coons Eat? Do They Need a Special Diet?


Try to ensure that your coon is getting regular exercise. This is slightly trickier in indoor cats. Options for exercise here include regular play, walking outside with a harness (if your coon will co-operate) or investing in a cat tree for inside your home.

Cat trees come in many shapes and sizes with some being a simple scratching post with a seat on top and others looking like climbing frames which take up an entire wall. For more information see my guide on the Best Cat Trees for Maine Coons.

Also, if you have space available in your garden, you could consider creating a ‘catio’. This is an outdoor space, usually a wooden frame lined with chicken wire, in which your indoor coon can enjoy some time outside.

If you have concerns regarding your Maine coon’s size then speak to your veterinarian. They can give you a better idea of a healthy weight for your pet to achieve. They can also offer advice on weight loss if your coon is considered to be overweight.

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